Increasing CTR for Your Tweets with Word Choice and Link Placement

by Gary on November 21, 2011

in Link Strategies,Social Media,Viral Marketing

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Last month I gave some tips about tweaking your Tweets for SEO purposes, well I’ve got a few more tips here for you from self-dubbed social media specialist Dan Zarella.

Dan Zarella, author of the newly published “Zarrella’s Hierarchy of Contagiousness: The Science, Design, and Engineering of Contagious Ideas”, caught my attention with two of his recent blog posts on Twitter click-through rates (CTR). In fact, I was so impressed with his work that I ended up reading his 2009 report on “The Science of ReTweets” in one sitting even though I had something else that needed doing.

The bits of information I’ll be focusing on this post, however, do not come from that report but from a more recent study he conducted wherein he gathered and analysed 200,000, random, bit.ly-link-containing Tweets with learning about Twitter CTR as his specific goal. What he has learned will indeed prove useful for anyone who uses Twitter to get more traffic to their site, since we now know specific words that might increase (or decrease) CTR for our tweets. According to Dan, some of the words that have the highest positive correlation with Twitter CTR include:

  • daily is out – 33.3% CTR for Tweets with these phrase as opposed to 1.9% CTR for those without it.
  • via – 6.37% CTR for Tweets with these phrase as opposed to 1.9% CTR for those without it.
  • @ – 5.41% CTR for Tweets with these phrase as opposed to 1.23% CTR for those without it.
  • RT – 4.19% CTR for Tweets with these phrase as opposed to 1.47% CTR for those without it.
  • please – 3.57% CTR for Tweets with these phrase as opposed to 2.1% CTR for those without it.
  • check – 2.53% CTR for Tweets with these phrase as opposed to 2.07% CTR for those without it.

What this simply means for us is that using the above words (or using the services of paper.li in the case of the phrase “daily is out”) is something that we should keep in mind as we tweet. Moreover, it also goes to show that retweets really do help drive traffic, so that you should indeed be conscious about counting the retweets containing your URLs.

On the other hand, words to avoid due to negative correlation include@addthis, marketing, and @getglue.

Another thing that could prove to be very useful is his infographic on the Twitter CTR Heat Map (shown below). The heatmap reveals the best position for placing a link on a tweet, again based on the 200,000 tweets he studied. Obviously, the best position to place a link to get a higher CTR for your tweets is between the beginning and the middle of your tweet, with the worst position being right after the beginning of the tweet. So now that you know which words to use when you tweet, make sure you structure your tweets to make the most of data from the heatmap.

Twitter CTR Heatmap

 

Image Credits:
Twitter CTR Heatmap Infographic by Dan Zarella
Twordle Twitter Icon by GraphicLeftOvers.com

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